Since I gave you a 14 hour recipe yesterday, I figured today we’d make it a little shorter.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

You know… like 9 hours.

But! At least this time you won’t have to cover your entire kitchen in flour, spend four days digging dough out from under your nails, scrub melted burned butter off the bottom of your oven and give the entire recipe you made to someone else because you can’t be trusted around it.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

This time you can just throw it in a big pot and forget about it.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

And drink beer while you’re at it. Winning!

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

I can’t believe there was a time in my life that I didn’t think I liked onions. I don’t even know how it is possible for someone who loves food to not like onions because they add a ridiculous amount of delicious flavor in so many different ways to so many different dishes.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

And even though I used to think I didn’t care for them?

I still ordered french onion soup anyway. I’m sure you know why. The cheeeeese. And the bread. I distinctly remember sitting at a restaurant a few years ago and the server bringing one of our dining neighbors a piping bowl of soup with golden cheese just literally pouring down the sides.

All I could think was…

sign

me

up

for

that!

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

For years after, I ordered french onion soup… and only ate the bread and cheese. I’d dig my spoon down in half way, grabbing a bite of toasted bread, a spoonful of broth, and strands upon strands of gruyere or gouda. I’d always finish everything in the bowl, except for the big pile of caramelized onions on the bottom.

I liked that set up. I liked it a lot.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

Then, as I’ve detailed before – much like his Diet Mountain Dew habit, my husband developed an addiction to caramelized onions and asked for them on everything. Even weirdo things like pasta and eggs. I seriously think I made them nearly every day for three months. I first tried them on a burger, slathered in cheese and ketchup of course. Then we moved on to steak, and once I even put them in a salad… that sort of tasted good. Just don’t try it hungover.

Caramely onions? I could do this.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

After all, if there was any vegetable for me to learn to love, it had to be the one filled with sugar that softened and sweetened easily and almost tasted candy-like at times, right? Right on.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

So hopefully by this point I don’t have to do any convincing and we can let this cheese do the talking.

And if you stillll don’t like onions? Make this anyway and just eat the bread and cheese and broth like I did circa 1999. Totally worth it.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

Crockpot French Onion Soup

[adapted from Tyler Florence]

makes a giant pot, about 8-10 servings

4 medium sweet onions, thinly sliced

3 garlic cloves, minced

4 tablespoons of butter

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (I used my favorite Fustinis!)

2 tablespoons brown sugar

3 tablespoons flour

8 ounces of beer

64 ounces of low-sodium beef stock

2 tablespoons fresh thyme

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon salt

french bread

gruyere cheese, sliced

Set your crock pot on high, then add onions, garlic, brown sugar, butter, salt and balsamic and mix until combined. Cover and let cook for 60 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onions are a bit caramely and brown on the edges. Add in flour, then stir thoroughly and let sit for 5 minutes. Add in beer, beef stock, thyme, and pepper, then turn heat down to low, cover and cook for 6-8 hours.

Before serving, cut french bread or baguette into slices. Fill soup bowls to the top, then cover with slice of bread and a slice of cheese. Set under the broiler for 2-3 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly and golden brown. Be careful when serving as bowls will be hot!

Note: I used a very low-sodium beef stock, so depending on the stock you use, add additional salt for flavor if desired.

Crockpot French Onion Soup I howsweeteats.com

I want to live inside that bowl.

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254 Responses to “Crockpot French Onion Soup.”

  1. #
    151
    Becca @ Amuse Your Bouche — March 26, 2013 @ 7:12 am

    Hey Jessica, thought I’d let you know that I made your soup the other day and loved it! :) Your recipes never fail me.

    http://www.amuse-your-bouche.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/slow-cooker-french-onion-soup.html

    Reply

  2. #
    152
    Kris — May 17, 2013 @ 6:17 pm

    The Crock-Pot Duo is perfect for entertaining
    and having the two slow cookers that adjust independently of each other.

    Take this 5 minutes to go ahead and clean up the slow cooker.
    Make the most of your slow cooker by making clean up a breeze with these simple tips.

    Reply

  3. #
    153
    Rico — August 1, 2013 @ 12:37 am

    The company who started this campaign eventually became the world’s largest soap company. There are two ways to go about this, firstly, change your diet and secondly use some natural products that help adjust your sugar levels without the side effects. It is necessary for us to figure out effective ways to solve this tough trouble.

    Reply

  4. #
    154
    Lora — August 3, 2013 @ 3:05 am

    If you’re going to use it for cooking food for yourself only, then you can choose a small electric model that will be enough for that purpose. You can also ensure your vegetables are done at precisely the same time as your steaks. Get rid of the debris that is clogging it and test the igniter again.

    Reply

  5. #
    155
    paleo diet cooking — August 29, 2013 @ 7:28 am

    Legume includes navy, kidney, string, black, and pinto beans,
    chickpeas (garbanzo beans), lentils, carob, licorice, and
    peanuts. In less sunny or cloudier climates the skin manufactures vitamin D at a diminished rate,
    which can also cause seasonal depression for many people in these areas.
    Wheat happens to be quite abundant in both lectins and gluten, and
    research has shown that there is a connection between
    arthritis and an intolerance to both of these substances.

    Reply

  6. #
    156
    Dawn — October 3, 2013 @ 9:16 am

    What do you think will happen if I just throw all the ingredients in the pot and set it to low before running out the door? In case I hypothetically read “throw it in one pot and forget it” and then neglect to read all the directions until I scroll down a bit to check the type of cheese… Is it ruined?

    Reply

    • Traci — October 12th, 2014 @ 10:57 am

      I did the same thing and I’m very worried :( how did yours turn out?

      Reply

  7. #
    157
    Patti — January 16, 2014 @ 1:24 pm

    a friend shared this on BookFace. LOVE your description!!!!! hehehe Thankx fer the awesome recipe. This is my favorite soup…..

    Reply

  8. #
    158
    ELOISE PETERSON — January 25, 2014 @ 11:36 am

    I AM SORRY TO SAY THAT WHILE THIS SOUP LOOKS DELICIOUS, IN MY HANDS THE END RESULT WAS TOTALLY TASTELESS…FLAT. WHEN I SERVED IT THE SECOND TIME I ADDED MORE BREAD AND MORE CHEESE AND…. A LITTLE BETTER BUT JUST A LITTLE. I’LL NEVER MAKE THIS RECIPE AGAIN. :(

    Reply

  9. #
    159
    Neutrino — February 9, 2014 @ 11:20 pm

    Do yourself a favor and actually caramelize the onions in a sautée pan first. They WILL NEVER caramelize in a slow-cooker. (Onions excrete water when cooking. Water boils at 212°F, far lower than the caramelization temp of fructose (230°F), or sucrose (320°F). As such, the temp cannot get much above 212° until the water has vaporized and departed. This cannot happen when the lid is on.)

    Beyond the profound incompetence of instructing readers to do what is not permitted by the laws of physics, I have high hopes for this recipe.

    Reply

    • Ella — June 20th, 2014 @ 1:17 am

      Mine caramelised just fine :)

      Reply

  10. #
    160
    Linda — September 12, 2014 @ 11:43 am

    There are so many different types of beer. Which one did you use and it might explain why someone had a disappointing result. Would be grateful for the name or type of beer you used . Thank you.

    Reply

  11. #
    161
    al — November 3, 2014 @ 2:35 pm

    do not waste your time, like I just did!
    It was horrible and I had to dump it all out!

    Reply

  12. #
    162
    Alana — November 16, 2014 @ 12:36 pm

    This is the best recipe I have ever done for FO soup! My husband requests it all the time! It’s sooo easy and cheap to make ! Makes restaurant FO soup totally forgettable & not worth it , especially since they charge so much for a teeny tiny bowl. I’ve added my thing to it (we are huge pepper and RWvinegar fans ) but overall, it’s the way to go as far as FO soup goes for us! Thanks Tyler !
    I love this recipe !

    Reply

  13. #
    163
    Brian — November 24, 2014 @ 10:44 pm

    Normally I would not post on a recipe, but this one needs warning. Do not make this. There is a reason you can not just take a normal recipe and make it in a slow cooker.

    This soup lacks all depth. It is flavorless, and too sweet. The onions are tough, and do not caramelize in a slow cooker. So disappointed.

    Reply

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